About your Search

20120926
20121004
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101 (some duplicates have been removed)
. so this is the regular meeting of the board of education of san francisco unified school district for september 25, 2012 is now called to order. roll call please. (roll call). >> thank you. >> if you would like to join us for the pledge of allegiance. pledge one and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. okay. i get the first word. giants go. another world series champion. okay. seriously let's get back to the agenda. item a approval of board minutes for the regular minutes of march 13, 2012, august 14, 2012, september 11, 2012. is there a motion for all three? >> [inaudible] >> is there a second. >> second. >> any corrections? roll call please. >> thank you. >> yes. >> ms. (roll call. that is six aye's. >> thank you. presentations to the board of education superintendent report. superintendent carranza your thoughts for the evening. >> great thank you president yee. ladies and gentlemen and all of our parents listening at home. i wish you a good evening. thank you for being here in the board room. just
of education forum with the coleman advocates and other community partner and bayville and more details will be followed. >> thank you. item e, parent advisory council report. pap representative. >> good evening commissioners. thank you for the time. i am tony telrico and my daughter is at sunset elementary school. she's a joyful learner and proud of her school community. this is my year on the pac so i'm a month in and we had two engaging meetings so far. we are looking forward to working there. it's to represent parent voices and perspective to inform of board of education policies and this will address our issues for this school year and our process for developing action plans to pursue those issues. the pac looked at data about student achievement over the past several years, identify ways to engage families to strengthen the district's initiatives and reviewing major questions and concerns that heard from families during our community conversations that the pac has conducted over the last few years. at the beginning of this school year the pac members met with superintenden
that he and the family provided. his contributions to our education community will be sorely missed, but for the generations to come forward for will provide, continue to provide the kind of education and job skills that we need for our city. over the last few weeks, i have been working closely with the city college to assess their fiscal, managerial, and accreditation issues. i want to thank the people behind me. in particular, the interim chancellor pamela fisher is here, and the current trustees, natalie burke is here today, i need a barrier is also here. thank you very much. also representing our students, mr. walker is here as well. [applause] with any educational institution that has value as our city college, not only did we work with those that are currently involved with them, but we worked as a city family. there is no way to express at this time the need to have this a family together to support our city college. so also i have representatives of the comptroller's office, then rosenfield, mickey callahan, the human resources divisions that are here today, nadia from our p
now, you asked -- supervisor cohen, you asked when did this start, when did this education drop off. it started before you were born. it's been happening a long time. so, when you said -- when you said it takes a healthy community, that means working. healthy -- if you don't work, you don't eat. and, so, this is what we're trying to do in bayview hunters point. i come here with a message for you to appeal to your better wisdom and your judgment because that's what [inaudible]. >> thank you very much, sir. >>> thank you, sir. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >>> i'm even too old to really address this because i'm over 10 years removed. but i can remember when tupac died and one of my cool teachers put "we love you, tupac" a picture of him in the class. and the principal told her to remove it. and that just points to the disconnect. i mean, instead of trying to get me to understand shakespeare first, who i might not like or don't care about, try to show me how writing a thesis is equivalent to writing a good song. you've got to meet the youth where they're at. and what i see from
full well many students who have not been able to participate in college education. and even in [speaker not understood], because by the way, you have to be academically ready to ascend and not just be at the labor reer level. -- laborer level. so, i'm happy, supervisor cohen, and president chiu, you understand where we are at and we are not turning a blind aye to this issue -- [multiple voices] >> thank you, commissioner. commissioner fewer. >> yes, i'd like to comment a little bit about looking at the state. quite frankly, when i saw this data, i myself was very, very shocked particularly about the students not on track for graduation. supervisor, i share your concern. i think as far as the pathway, this is a pathway to nowhere. so, i just want to emphasize about the difference between feel better and do better. i know if you're not really in this conversation all the time, what does it really mean when we give two sets of data that say, on track c or better and on track d or better. on that track d or better is a lie, it is a lie to all our students because we instituted a
with the new budget cuts. of course, my university is being privatized. all of the higher education is being privatized. all through the uc system. how do you run a modern state with tax cuts? we resort to desperate, back last november, we were asked to vote to make four indian casinos in san diego county pony up money. i thought this was a joke. they voted to do it. now, the governor proposes to borrow against future revenues. how did they deal with these social problems when the economic problems were far worse than what we can imagine today? this is from larry halprin's. and it has these quotes from roosevelt on the wall. he said in one of his talks to the people, "the test is not whether we have more, it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little". it's a different philosophy than that which we have become used to. what i am going to show you is a lost civilization. it's a strange place. and yet, it becomes oddly familiar after a while because we built it and use it every day without knowing it. it has been buried. the living new deal project is like an archaeological dig
conversation for us to have with our families because so much of our education system is rooted in mediocrity. so, trying to convince our families that there is a better should not have been a conversation we were spending any time on, and we did. and it took us a year to get through that. there has been growth in the last three years. it's slow, and it's not enough and we acknowledge that. we're starting to see a lot of the blending of services both at the city and the school district, which include after school and out of school time. and i think that that has been a tremendous support for so many of our kids. but i also want to acknowledge that all of our 21st century funding has been eliminated in our high schools and that has impact. and these are the constant things that we're dealing with. we work off of a budget that's projected and then we're told you really don't have that money. so, the scaling up and then scaling back is just part of our reality. and it's not an excuse, but it's a reality. but we continue to invest in our communities and we continue to invest in our schools. and i
connections and having a context. when we start talking to people about the importance of school and education, if we have generations of folks who have maybe not graduated from high school or don't have geds or have had a hard time with getting a job and you say you need to go to school to get a job, and that's not something that they have a context for, it's about creating these internships, but also these mentoring opportunities, brown bag series where people come in and share their stories of how they ended up where they are and what that process looked like. and i think for me the most memorable one was when we did it with mayor brown, and he talked about it was right time, right place. that there was somebody that was there to help him. it wasn't because he had this really great plan did & it was all in alignment. he went to san francisco state and somebody took a chance on him and said, this is a program, you're going to be on probation. but if you don't make it, if you don't do what you're supposed to, it's on you. and that really resonated with a lot of the young folks that we had the
time and again, touches on, again, education attainment issues. >> i guess at some point in my -- i wonder if we can track some of this. are we tracking it? >> we do have tracking for a number of youth. a breakdown of that demographic. >> i guess the students that are maybe not achieving at the level that we'd like to see, i'd like to understand of those -- of that population that were placed in jobs, what were the challenges they found. >> of course. >> i know that in one instance we found that it was hard for some of the young people, they didn't have computer access. it was hard for them to fill out the applications and that sort of thing. it was just basic on that level. and then we found that in a couple of instances we provided some support groups for young people to talk about what the challenges were that they had met with successful. these were almost voluntary -- we worked with the y and we worked with west side services to provide some of those support groups. and we had a couple in some instances. i think it would be good to have the young people kind of give input as to
and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future,
the time needed to build up a great community of people sharing cars. that lets us find great cars, educate the owners, educate the renters, and ensure there is the right balance and variety of cars. if you look on the site in san francisco, you will literally see cars all over the place. it is all over the bay area. you are seeing cars sharing happening in places it never had before. we worked with the city to see if there were any ways we could get out the word. we hope to work with existing programs or be added as an additional transportation solution. in general, we like to involve the city and city leaders in our announcement of coming to market, and it has been working really well. >> i know you have community managers all over the globe. what's going on there? >> airbnb goes to network effects. we are all over in -- we are already in 19 cities all over the world. we just provide the tools on line, and local residents throughout the world decide they want to be part of the movement and part of airbnb and list their homes on the site, and local travelers decide they want to go somewhe
monthly income. >> you can enroll in free educational services online. just as it -- visit sfsmartmoney.org. with services like financial education classes and one-on-one meetings with advisers, asset smart money network makes it easy for you to learn all you need to know about managing, saving, investing, and protecting your money. the network offers access to hundreds of financial aid programs. to help their eruptions, fill out the quick questionnaire, and you will be steered to the program you are looking for. >> who want to make sure everyone has the chance to manage their money successfully, keep their money safe, and avoid getting ripped off. >> it sounds very good. i think people should try that one. >> to find out more, visit sfsmartmoney.org or call 211 and ask about the bank on s.f. program. >> now you can have a bank account. open one today. >> and it is my honor to introduce governor jerry brown of california. i think. ok. in ibm research, one of the things we talk about is our laboratories. i have been all over the world, live in different countries. i am a relatively recen
a four year college education or have a job and that is the measure here and a couple of things to say is that i think that -- i think the test scores are great but the things we need to touch the students also is a great sense of resiliency. if you don't get it once you can try it again and you know what? you can try it again and again and you can be successful and takes some of us twice to take algebra like myself and for some of us is takes three and the deep critical thinking that we're sending our students from san francisco out with a real critical mind that they're going to question. they're going to question how things have been and how come they're different from the other people and the kind of students we want to educate here in san francisco for the future society in san francisco and i wanted us to keep in mind about the graduation rates and also how we get there so are we engaging students in a really thoughtful way? are we allowing them to guide us on what is engaging as curriculum and what is not? and this critical thinking i think is so important, so i would like
it by programs so this is looking at our special education students as well as our english language learners and we do see in 2008 we tested three two 98 students on the test and as compared to 212 we tested 2,094 students. in the first three years which is 2008, nine, and ten, we were introducing the cma or the state was introducing the cma through the grade levels so first was the elementary grades. then the secondary grades and then high school subject grades, so it was being introduced, so when you look at the last two years you will see that we have increased the number of students taking the special ed because it was 1,920 in 2011 and now in 2012 we have this amount taking the csd. the english language adult proficiency level over these years is 12% increased but has to be looked at with the lens that they were students taking moving on to take zvzv okay. over the last two years we did see increase in csd and when we disaggregated the results from movement we see the same trend as we saw in the district which is growth for matched students. okay. there is also a break down that we
and being raised by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already
-- great devastation. we take the opportunity to educate everyone. it is a pleasure for me to work under the direction of mayor lee. he is a public safety championship. he is a prepared as champion. he lives it. i have seen his kids and his workplace. it is all about teamwork. i am proud to be working with chief suhr. and scott weiner, it is a pleasure to have you out here. we appreciate it. it is a great team. thank you to the people who are out here. and also our partners with the american red cross. who are here this morning. thank you for being here. it has been a tradition for many of us out here. i hope you have a great day and you remember what happened 106 years ago. it is great to be a san franciscan. >> a nice hand for the chief, everybody. i have seen this other chief speaking in the last couple of times. a nice hand for chief suhr. >> good morning. our fire chief said it. we're lucky in san francisco. we have a mayor who has moved through the tears of prepared as an goddess ready to go. we get a little more prepared every day. god bless to the survivors. >> thank you. >> it i
of that assessment an educational process of how do we ride bicycles here in san francisco? because it's kind of confusing. >> thank you. >> the next question is for miss breed, mr. davis and miss johnson. a recent civil grand jury report called the san francisco ethics commission essentially a sleeping watchdog. at the request of supervisor campos the city requested a comparison of ethics in san îg:]Ñand los angele identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city,
for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be reformed or eliminated to help balance the city's bu
, education, housing, mental health services that will enable individuals to break the -- break free from violence and long-term seminal behavior disrupting the into generational cycle of crime. in response to the mayor's direction to immediately interrupt, we are working very closely with our criminal justice partners. in addition to that, we have opened an office in bayview to bring our staff closer to the population that they are here to serve. [applause] that office opened on august 1. in addition to that, through the support of the mayor and board, we will be completing evidence- based individualize risk and needs assessment of the cases that we are supervising an employee in the use of investment of over $4.7 million in the city's money that they have invested in the employment education, mental health, housing, and treatment. we have also created specialized caseloads for those high-risk transitional-age youth, including gender-responsive caseloads so we can meet the needs of our young men and women. in addition to that, we have an enhanced collaboration as a member of the gang tas
you start out with treatment and you go to some education to having much more of an array of approaches. so a person might start out with a part-time job at the same time they're in substance abuse treatment and going to some counseling for mental health issues and dealing with family problems. all simultaneously. and in order to do that, the third element of the approach is everybody seems to have, for our clients, about a half dozen or more case managers. and so, i said, when i first came to this job, if they already have a case manager, that's good enough for us. and, and we will deputize other case managers in the city to be our tanf or our homeless case manager as long as they can continue to help the people along the road both to recovery and to self-sufficiency, and they can tap directly into our services and supports so that they can have help with housing, have help with education, have help with getting a job. but maybe they're bringing their expertise from substance abuse or mental health and the final element is the family or the individual chooses who their pr
that the board of education decides. you know, we as a body here do not have the authority to say one way or the other. where we come in is that if the position of the board of education is continue to have that, then there is a memorandum of understanding that outlines that relationship. then i think it is appropriate for this committee to discuss that, which is what we're doing. but ultimately the decision of whether to allow or not allow, that's ultimately up to the san francisco unified school district through its board of education and, you know, in consultation with the superintendent of schools. so, that's not our decision to make here today. but if it's okay with my colleagues, if we can have a motion to continue to the call of the chair, and we will make sure this item is at the top of the agenda for the next meeting of the joint committee to make sure that we have, you know, a resolution on this issue. so, can we have a motion? motion by commissioner maufus, seconded by commissioner fewer. if we can take that without objection. and again, we want to thank all the members of the
there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to club owners and management personnel. >> thank you. wh
is happening. also a reflection of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much a
that they might have children in tow. and, you know, education can be a barrier, if, you know, there's a very high likelihood of drug and alcohol addiction and failure to complete a formal education. so the barriers, basically, just go on and on, with the underlying issue being drug and alcohol addiction. so what we do at our program is, at a safe haven, is that we find out why people are in crisis, if it's chronic or if it's for the first time. and if it is a drug and alcohol problem that's keeping them from the workforce, let's solve that first. and then let's move them through a continuum of care that's going to be unique to their specific challenges so that we can really pave the way so once they do get employed, they're going to be retained and they're going to be successful. and that's, i think, at the end of the day what all employers want. and, gary, does this change much for those who have mental health problems? well, i think the situation for people with severe mental illness, and by that i'm referring to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. but it includes a wide range of psychiatric di
with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain difference or a picture of a scan or whatever it is, you
. so we have to get services in there. we have to get education so that we can begin to link the services and begin to intervene as quickly as possible. and when we come back we're going to be talking a little bit more about the dynamics of a family that faces substance and mental disorders. we'll be right back. [music playing] when a family member has a substance abuse or mental disorder, it has a profound impact on the family unit. whether it is the young person who's having an issue and its impact on the siblings and on the parents and their time and effort, their ability to get treatment and help that individual recover. but it's also what happens when a young person has a parent or an adult in their life who is struggling with addiction or who has a mental disorder. so helping the family unit deal with what's going on in the family, as opposed to dealing with just the individual who's having the illness or the addiction, is really critical. when the family discovers that a family member has a mental health problem or a substance use problem, the response of the family de
organizer with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in california, and has a robust community real estate finance unit. next, we have the ceo of ne community federal credit union. since 1988, she has been the ceo of northwest community federal credit union. under her watch, the credit union group to over 1600 members. it has become the national model for institutions seeking to provide financial education and banking services to the low- income communities. last but not least, we have our conditional lender represented here by wells fargo. mark cyrus is the senior fda banker for the region -- the senior sba banker. he held businesses choose the best loans for the growing business and focus on a comprehensive understanding of their goals for their business. mark is responsible for helping entrepreneurs with sba loans every step of the way. i would like each of you to speak a l
on their feet or even work force development or educational opportunities to help a mother who is homeless, for example, to get on their feet, we need much more of that, and we cannot cut programs that will increase the roles of the homeless. i believe that the project homeless connect and some of the projects created by previous administrations are not enough. we need to look at transitional housing but also continuing the type of support to help people get back on their feet. the job training and other types of programs that the mayor's office of economic and workforce of all men are working on are really important to ensure that unemployed people and potentially homeless people can be trained in the new green economy and green jobs. there is also a lot of other types of work force development being done, but i think it has to be targeted at some of the lowest income, highest vulnerability populations in our city, and that would help prevent homelessness from growing. but i hope that as we look at homeless policy, we take a man approached that does not blame homeless people for their own
partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank all of you for coming. many of you may have assistance. i know many merchants could not be here. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligations for the ada, there are the mechanisms to provi
their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track is a successful program and we've used a very smal
of difficult conversations. so much of this is about educating the city as a whole from all generations and perspectives. our housing policies and transportation systems are not always sustainable. if we want to remain a cutting edge and diversity that draws all sorts of people here, we're going to have to change. we're going to have to consider new ways of doing things the year or two ago we may not have been comfortable thinking about. there is a big education process that has to occur. i know we will work together to make sure that happens. i know we can move in the right direction. i look forward to that work. thank you. [applause] >> rounding out the to affect the -- trifecta is our own board of supervisors president, david chiu. >> if you are like me, you did not come here to hear from elected officials. i look forward to hearing from the innovators. i wanted to join my colleagues in assuring all of you that we are looking forward to working with you to figure out how we create san francisco as the capital of innovation and the new economy. before i joined the board of supervisors
to educate people to understand how it is different even from car sharing. this is real people, real cars. we think it has even broader environmental and community implications. we got a $one. 7 million grant from the federal highway administration to launch a three-year study on peer to peer car sharing. we will be reporting back on how that is going. we will know quickly in terms of the impact of peer to peer cars sharing of people choosing not to own a vehicle. as we look at ways of enabling this behavior, not sharing your car is easier than sharing. it will have benefits, monetary, environmental, community, making the world a better place, helping people. i think all of us in this room want that. with this new tax on airbnb, each of these things are deterrents to doing the right thing. i hope we can make more innovative and informed decisions to make it easy to share. i would like to see tax incentives for any sort of sharing behavior. i think that is probably where it will go in the future. until we get that together, there is only a tax on airbnb. >> do you mind if i clarify that? the t
of anyone. i have many years and seven years as an educators and taught there and president of board of ethics and board of appeals and 25 years of experience in doing service to the neighborhood. i am supported by the incumbent and scott wiener and others and i want very bad to be your supervisor and i am asking for your support and there's give me your vote on november 6. thank you. >> hi. i am joel io and i am running for supervisor and they have a way of looking at the happy meals but can't fill pot holes. where is the common sense? and many paid twice to fill the pot holes and where is the accountability of our money? so if you're tired of your house being the city's atm, if you're tired of the same politics and same choices i offer you an independent choice. i promise to be your advocate and work for you and not for the special interests and the super pacs that pass the other candidates and it's important in the junk mail and look at the fine print and see who is really spending on who and who is beholden to who. i worked as a journalist for years and i will bring that c
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101 (some duplicates have been removed)